It’s Bird Flu, Not A Hangover

Some people are really might be incapable of telling the difference between a hangover and flu, particularly when feeling sick during the festive season. There is one type of flu that no one would ever be able to confuse with a hangover and that is bird flu. A hangover always feels awful, but if you’re still feeling that bad after two weeks then either your liver has been destroyed or you could have a case of bird flu. Either of which is possible during the course of the festive season given people’s drinking habits during that time. Continuous punishment of your liver can lead to flu like symptoms and if your body is in a weakened state when you do get a strain of flu like bird flu it has a greater chance of being fatal.

There was a huge increase in awareness about flu last year particularly bird flu which led to a lot of policy being made for coping with an outbreak. There was a lot of concern at the time that there would be a widespread outbreak of the H5N1 strain of flu or worse, an escalation into a fully fledged pandemic. Bird flu was first discovered in poultry in 1997, but it didn’t become a major health scare until widespread contraction by humans occurred in Asia. It was reported in Europe last year and the level of awareness about the disease grew to unprecedented levels.

The greatest reason for the level of concern many people have about bird flu is the increased rate of mortality for those who contracted that strain of influenza. The outbreak in Asia was remarkable for both the high fatality rate and the lightning fast rate at which people succumbed to the infection. This was despite the fact that bird flu does not spread in the same manner as normal strains of flu.

The manner in which it spreads is one of the main factors that are believed to have prevented it spreading as far as many analysts believed it would. One of the major fears is that the strain could mutate and begin to spread in the same manner as normal colds and flu. This has lead to a large number of stockpiles being created of the bird flu vaccine, Tamiflu in preparation for a potential outbreak. The largest area of concern is the big cities, like London where close proximity can lead to any cold or flu spreading like wildfire between people.

The health risks lead to an increase in the number of flu vaccinations being utilised and the governments have begun stockpiling Tamiflu vaccines, for use if the threat became reality. There were and still are problems with this method of addressing the problem since there were a number of questions about how effective the vaccine would be if it was used in that situation. There are many different bird flu vaccines and medications available that are believed to be more effective against bird flu, but for different reasons have not be made use of as much as Tamiflu has. Many people have begun using alternate bird flu vaccines to prevent any weaknesses that the stockpiled vaccines might have.

Source by Juliette Van Rooyen

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